DC Ward 7 Opinion Poll

Executive Summary

The Streetcar:

According to a scientific survey conducted by a Ward 7 data professional, registered voters in Ward 7 support extending the DC Streetcar by a substantial margin, and support is shared broadly across a variety of demographic and economic groups. Overall, 61.9 percent of Ward 7 registered voters either strongly support or somewhat support the streetcar extension, while only 27.6 percent of registered voters strongly oppose or somewhat oppose the extension; 10.4 percent of voters are unsure. The 34.3 point difference between support and oppose is well beyond the poll’s 5.5 percent margin of error. The support for the extension is shared across every demographic group, with net-positive support from all age groupings, race groupings, income groupings, gender groupings, educational groupings, and home ownership status. Because of the broad cross-sectional support, the survey’s findings on streetcar opinion are not sensitive to the poll’s weighting or demographic model.

Core DC Halfway Home:

Ward 7 voters tend to support the proposed halfway home, but public opinion on this issue is less clear cut. Overall, 52.7 of Ward 7 voters strongly support or somewhat support the proposed halfway home, while 35.2 percent of respondents strongly oppose or somewhat oppose the halfway home; however, support and opposition towards the halfway home varies substantially by demographic group. The 17.5 point spread between support and oppose is outside of the poll’s margin of error, but the support’s spread over a 50-percent majority is not. Because support and opposition towards the halfway home varies across demographic groups, the poll’s findings are sensitive to weighting and demographic assumptions.

Public Housing Funding:

The preferred method for funding public housing improvements is higher taxes on the wealthy and corporations. 52.5 percent of respondents stated their top choice for funding public housing was through higher taxes on the wealthy. 13.4 percent of respondents said their preferred method for funding public housing improvements was to cut the District’s police budget. Despite being supported by several at-large city councilors and supported by some advocacy groups, only 3.9 percent of respondents chose reducing the public transportation budget as their top choice to fund public housing. The top choice of increasing taxes on the wealthy is not sensitive to weighting and demographic assumptions.

Methods:

The text-to-web survey of Ward 7 registered voters had 427 unique respondents and was conducted from September 16th through September 19th. The survey was conducted and coordinated independently by Ward 7 resident Michael Havlin; the data was collected by Point Blank Political. Using a Random Iterative Model, the raw data was weighted by gender, race, political party, age, and four-year-degree status. The margin of error is +/- 5.5 percent. Population estimates for post-stratification weights were generated using a combination of Census data, and third-party-provided data (see methods document for more info).

For the full report and data see links below:

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